Hold Your Breath [AKA Dans La Brume / Just A Breath Away] (2018, dir. Daniel Roby)

A toxic gas of unknown origin fills Paris; an estranged couple with a sick daughter try to survive. Clever and surprisingly emotional apocalyptic thriller, making the most of its premise and the chance to focus on relationships as much as plot-driving missions. Well worth your time.

Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019, dir. Jon Watts)

Peter Parker, on a European school trip with his classmates, comes into contact with both elemental monsters and a new superhero, Mysterio. Upbeat if overlong blend of teen road trip comedy and standard heroic action thrills, acting as a coda to Avengers: Endgame. Well-played and likeable, if episodic on several levels.

Men In Black: International (2019, dir. F Gary Gray

A probationary agent finds herself partnered with an MIB legend when an intergalactic crisis looms. Stuttering series reboot, transplanting a star pairing from another franchise with indifferent results. Okay action, poor comedy. Misunderstanding what made the first movies successful results in a film that was more fun to make than it is to watch.

The Night Eats The World (2018, dir. Dominique Rocher)

A man wakes up to find he’s the last survivor of a zombie apocalypse. Fine addition to the subgenre, focusing on character and heart rather than on horror thrills; though there’s not much more to say about zee, this fills in a few gaps pleasantly enough.

Hugo (2011, dir. Martin Scorsese)

A boy lives in a railway station clock. Splendid family adventure, as well as a love letter to early cinema. Scorsese enjoying playing in a new genre and with some fresh cinematic toys, not least the remarkable use of 3D. Hugely recommended.

Jules et Jim (1962, dir. Francois Truffaut)

Two decades (pre- and post-WWI)in the lives of two men and the woman they both love. Peerless example of the French New Wave; its impact dulled by time perhaps inevitably, but nevertheless a fascinating movie crammed with daring thematic and technical ideas.

Mission Impossible: Fallout (2018, dir. Christopher McQuarrie)

Ethan Hunt and his team battle a nuclear conspiracy involving followers of Solomon Lane. Splendid series continuation from Part 5 (MI: Rogue Nation), with hugely-impressive stuntwork and the usual emphasis on twists and double-crosses. Recommended.