As Good As It Gets (1997, dir. James L Brooks)

A selfish author with OCD falls in love with the waitress who serves him breakfast. Splendid romantic comedy with a sharp edge, and a road-trip element. Fine performances from the three leads and a great script. Recommended.

The Terminal (2004, dir. Steven Spielberg)

After a bureaucratic foul-up leaves him stateless, a man is forced to live in an airport terminal. Well-directed comedy-drama which starts brilliantly and then gets bogged down in sub-plots and a shift from existential malaise to schmaltz.

National Treasure (2004, dir. Jon Turteltaub)

A treasure seeker is in a race against time to find a fabled hoard. Daft but hugely enjoyable chase and puzzle-based comedy-thriller, riffing off Dan Brown, Indiana Jones, and Mission: Impossible equally. Lots of fun if you’re in the mood.

Comedian (2002, dir. Christian Charles)

A documentary chronicling Jerry Seinfeld’s return to stand-up, and the life of an up-and-coming comic, Orly Adams. Decent doc that’s strong on the challenges of stand-up, the self-doubt and uncertainties that come with playing comedy clubs.

A Walk Among The Tombstones (2014, dir. Scott Frank)

An ex-cop turned unlicensed private eye investigates a kidnapping. Generally effective adaptation of one of Lawrence Block’s Matt Scudder novels, which perhaps over-reaches by telescoping several books’ backstory into a single narrative. Bleak and autumnal; not one of Neeson’s lighter actioners.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s review.

Dead Man Down (2013, dir. Niels Arden Oplev)

A man seeks revenge on the gangster who killed his family. Glum thriller that spends too much time on taking itself too seriously and with obvious mystery and romance subplots. Good technical credits, tho, and fun cameos (Armand Assante, F Murray Abraham).

GoodFellas (1990, dir. Martin Scorsese)

The rise and fall of mob informant Henry Hill. Peerless, confident, cine-literate story of a generation of Mafia-related life, which stands also as a lesson in popular music, Italian cookery, and the storytelling possibilities of cinema. Magical from first frame to last.