The Witches of Eastwick (1987, dir. George Miller)

Three friends accidentally conjure a priapic demon. Fun loose adaptation of the John Updike novel, offering four meaty roles for enthusiastic players. Nicholson is controlled, all are having fine time, and Miller’s direction is elegant throughout. A good job done all around.

Dead & Buried (1981, dir. Gary Sherman)

The town sheriff investigates a series of murders in a New England fishing community. Odd horror piece with excellent technical credits and some creepy ideas, plus one standout performance. Works better on a tonal rather than a logical level: less weird than Phantasm, though scarcely mainstream.

The Woods (2006, dir. Lucky McKee)

A rebellious teen with latent psychic powers finds herself in a sinister all-girls boarding school. A well-paced 60s-set supernatural tale that does what you might expect, but with some class and style.

Dark Shadows (2012, dir. Tim Burton)

An ancient vampire is resurrected; he vows to restore the family fortunes. Gothic comedy-horror revival of the 60s TV series. Initially very funny, but soon collapses as there’s not much story, and the film runs out of culture-clash gags. Looks great, though. Minor Burton, alas.

The Autopsy of Jane Doe (2016, dir. André Øvredal)

A father and son pair of coroners investigate a mysterious body found at a crime scene. The third act doesn’t quite deliver on the promise of the first two, but for the most part this is a terrific claustrophobic two-hander balancing gore and intrigue throughout.

Want another review? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s tuppence-worth.