The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014, dir. Peter Jackson)

Thorin is driven mad by gold-lust as warring factions converge on Mt Erebor. The concluding part of the prequel trilogy is pretty much for fans only by this stage, though it’s nevertheless an impressively-mounted and extravagant action fantasy.

Here’s the trailer.

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (2013, dir. Peter Jackson)

Bilbo and Thorin’s company reach Mount Erebor via Laketown. The middle instalment of the prequel trilogy is all the better for not having to worry about set-up, though it lacks a story of its own. Still, if well-heeled fantasy spectacle is your thing, then there’s plenty to enjoy here.

Here’s the trailer.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012, dir. Peter Jackson)

A home-loving halfling is recruited for a perilous quest. Beefed-up partial adaptation of the Tolkien children’s novel so that it acts as the first part of a Lord of the Rings prequel trilogy. The quieter parts work best, though this is an acceptable if somewhat bloated action fantasy in its own right.

Here’s the trailer.

Ghost Stories (2017, dir. Andy Nyman & Jeremy Dyson)

A paranormal investigator is given three cases to solve which will apparently prove the existence of the afterlife. Hugely entertaining and clever reworking of old-as-the-hills material, perhaps better enjoyed on a second viewing so its construction can be appreciated.

For another perspective, here’s Xussia’s view.

Cargo (2018, dir. Yolanda Ramke & Ben Howling)

A race against time to get a baby to safety following her father’s zombie virus infection. Quirky z-movie, both effective in places and slightly undone by its episodic nature. Good performances and a keen sense of place anchor the drama.

Black Panther (2018, dir. Ryan Coogler)

The new king of a hitherto secret technologically-advanced African nation faces a range of challenges to his accession. Supremely confident addition to the Marvel cinematic canon, which tells its origin story in an Afrofuturist way, ringing many changes on the template.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy (2005, dir. Garth Jennings)

Decent-enough adaptation of the Douglas Adams radio series/book/TV show which suffers – inevitably – from over-familiar┬ásource material; the new stuff works best. The cast works hard, production design is great, and there’s a sense of affection for the material and Adams throughout.