Kingsman: The Secret Service (2014, dir. Matthew Vaughn)

A cockney youth is inducted into an elite British secret agency. Confident spy comedy from the graphic novel series, both spoofing and celebrating Bond and The Avengers in equal measure. Stylised and violent; not for everyone in its laddish glee. A sequel, expanding the universe, soon followed.

Zero Dark Thirty (2012, dir. Kathryn Bigelow)

A dramatisation of the hunt for and killing of Osama Bin Laden. Sober and focused, with an eye for detail and on the selling of its version of events as truth through the use of faux documentary techniques, this works as an intelligent thriller throughout.

Miss Sloane (2016, dir. John Madden)

A ruthless Washington lobbyist goes against the pro-gun lobby. Initially intriguing though ultimately glib dramatic thriller with good performances and a sense of seriousness undone by an unbelievable third act.

Kingsman: The Golden Circle (2017, dir. Matthew Vaughn)

Kingsmen join with their American equivalent to battle a virus-wielding drug lord. Gleeful but over-stuffed, overlong and indulgent sequel, magnifying the first film‘s good points and its issues. Some fun to be had, tho, and Mark Strong gets a crowning moment of awesome.

6 Days (2017, dir. Toa Fraser)

A dramatisation of the 1980 Iranian embassy siege. Glum retelling which struggles to evidence a point for its existence, delivering neither on insight, telling detail, nor even on SAS action. Who Dare Wins was, at least, bonkers.

Body of Lies (2008, dir. Ridley Scott)

A CIA operative in the Middle East is caught between conflicting loyalties. Good-looking and well-directed though predictable tale of post-9/11 espionage, with opaque masculine moralities contrasted with a female archetype representing possible redemption.