Final Score (2018, dir. Scott Mann)

An American ex-soldier battles Eastern European separatists holding a football stadium to ransom. Hugely enjoyable Die Hard knockoff that doesn’t take itself too seriously, and which delivers in genre terms, as well as in representing football pretty well in a movie. Fun.

101 Dalmations II: Patch’s London Adventure (2003, dir. Jim Kammerud & Brian Smith)

Cruella de Vil attempts again to steal and kill the puppies; one dog stands alone. OK straight-to-DVD sequel, heavy on London cliches, slapstick, and cutesy pooches. No classic, certainly, but inoffensive fun nevertheless.

Mission Impossible: Fallout (2018, dir. Christopher McQuarrie)

Ethan Hunt and his team battle a nuclear conspiracy involving followers of Solomon Lane. Splendid series continuation from Part 5 (MI: Rogue Nation), with hugely-impressive stuntwork and the usual emphasis on twists and double-crosses. Recommended.

The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973, dir. Alan Gibson)

In modern-day London, Dracula is behind an establishment conspiracy to unleash a plague epidemic. Modish late series entry, with loads of ideas, and an approach drawing on SF and a Bond villain plot. Fun, within its limitations, and impeccably played.

Paddington 2 (2017, dir. Paul King)

Paddington ends up in prison after being wrongly convicted of a treasure map theft. Machine-tooled sequel balancing community spirit, slapstick, musical numbers and a climactic train chase. Expertly done, with a fine cast, especially a gleeful Hugh Grant.

The Darkest Dawn (2016, dir. Drew Casson)

A teenager escapes an alien invasion. More developed sequel to Hungerford, this time riffing on 28 Days Later and Heart of Darkness as much as Heinlein’s The Puppetmasters. Still some rough edges, but an improvement over the first instalment.

The Lady In The Van (2015, dir. Nicholas Hytner)

A writer finds he has no option but to allow an old lady to live in a van in his drive. Charming and semi-fantastical comedy-drama which makes much of its strong lead performances, and offers some neat asides about writing and processes of adaptation along the way.