Censor (2021, dir. Prano Bailey-Bond)

In 1980s London, a film examiner struggles when a horror movie reawakens a past trauma. Stylish and confident first feature, with an interesting premise and careful use of limited resources. Vaguely Peter Strickland-ish in its approach: a descent into madness rather than story as such: there’s plenty to admire here, nevertheless.

Here’s the trailer.

Cruella (2021, dir. Craig Gillespie)

An orphan seeks revenge on the fashion maven who killed her mother. Confident, stylish, though thin and overlong prequel to 101 Dalmatians. Basically a supervillain origin story (Cruella is Tim Burton-era Batman, plus Joker and Catwoman here) though borrowing from all-sorts, including The Terminator. MVP is Paul Walter Hauser, though everyone is in on the joke.

Here’s the trailer.

Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972, dir. Alan Gibson)

Dracula seeks revenge on the modern-day Van Helsings. This series reboot revisits plot elements from Taste The Blood Of and … Has Risen but sets them in then-contemporary Chelsea. The swinging London stuff was dated in ’72, but this is still a brisk romp with a time-capsule attraction and some grittier asides.

Here’s the trailer.

Carry On At Your Convenience [AKA Carry On Round The Bend] (1971, dir. Gerald Thomas)

A toilet factory is troubled by poor sales and industrial action. No lavatorial joke opportunity goes unpunished in this sitcom-ish patchy series entry (the 22nd), the series’ first underperformer at the box office (it makes the mistake of punching down). Of its time, to put it mildly. A couple of genius moments shine through, though the film has principal value as a social document and for exploring ideas (and locations) reused in Carry On Girls a couple of years later.

Here’s the trailer.

The Glass Man (2011, dir. Cristian Solimeno)

A man spiralling in work, money, and relationship issues is made an offer he daren’t refuse. Odd drama with genre elements that has strong performances (Andy Nyman and James Cosmo are great) though which struggles to tell a story: overlong, episodic but interesting, and worth sticking with despite its frustrations.

Here’s the trailer.

Last Christmas (2019, dir. Paul Feig)

A chaotic Londoner begins to repair her broken relationships when she meets a handsome stranger. Schematic sub-Richard Curtis romantic comedy which, a few good lines aside, clings to the clumsiest of premises. Heartless, but harmless: Henry Golding makes for am impressive beau though.

Here’s the trailer.

Legacy of Lies (2020, dir. Adrian Bol)

A former MI6 agent’s past comes back to haunt him. OK DTV actioner from the reliable Scott Adkins, with decent fight choreography and some pizazz in the direction. Secrets and double-crosses as per, though there’s couple of interesting script wrinkles. No gamechanger, but fans will be happy.

Here’s the trailer.

Enola Holmes (2020, dir. Harry Bradbeer)

Sherlock Holmes’ younger sister Enola investigates their mother’s disappearance. Handsomely-produced but wildly inconsistent Victorian teen detective romp. A strong cast and good production values help, but a weak and smug script scuppers the enterprise as a whole, despite fun moments.

Here’s the trailer.

The Courier (2019, dir. Zackary Adler)

A motorcycle courier foils an assassination attempt on a key witness. Genuinely terrible action thriller, shot around limited guest star availability and locations, padded with stock footage and nonsensical city-at-night driving shots of the Thames. Saddled with an abject script, Kurylenko does what she can.

Blue Story (2019, dir. Rapman)

London teens become inexorably drawn into turf warfare, and the violence that comes with it. Straightforward though vivid and confident debut, keenly balancing school and street, the ordinary world and the futility of revenge. Lots to admire, not least the use of music and fourth wall breaking throughout; writer-director Rapman is one to watch. Recommended.