Mary Poppins Returns (2018, dir. Rob Marshall)

A generation after the events of Mary Poppins, the magical nanny returns to the Banks family, this time to help them save their home. Despite care and affection for the original, this is a reprise rather than a sequel. Emily Blunt lacks the lightness of touch of Julie Andrews, and the songs tend to the unmemorable.

Accident Man (2018, dir. Jesse V Johnson)

A hitman who specialises in making his kills look like accidents is targeted for termination. Uneven but at times tremendous DTV martial arts black comedy. Plenty of action throughout, and a decent cast of genre staples making the most of their opportunities.

Scrooge (1935, dir. Henry Edwards)

A miser is haunted by a series of ghosts, so he may rethink his approach to Christmas and life. A charming adaptation of the oft-filmed Dickens novella A Christmas Carol, capturing a famous stage portrayal. Some lovely model effects and a keen visual sensibility; a touch of expressionism and a feel for the period on display here.

Hobbs & Shaw [AKA Fast and Furious (Presents): Hobbs & Shaw] (2019, dir. David Leitch)

Mismatched agents team up to prevent a bio-engineered villain from stealing a deadly toxin. Dumb-but-fun-but-dumb again action-comedy sidequel to the later Fast/Furious flicks. Jolly bickering and star cameos help, but the film too-quickly becomes wearying in its CG excesses when it should be at least physics-aware.

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Men In Black: International (2019, dir. F Gary Gray

A probationary agent finds herself partnered with an MIB legend when an intergalactic crisis looms. Stuttering series reboot, transplanting a star pairing from another franchise with indifferent results. Okay action, poor comedy. Misunderstanding what made the first movies successful results in a film that was more fun to make than it is to watch.

Avengement (2019, dir. Jesse V Johnson)

An escaped prisoner holds his gangster brother’s criminal friends hostage. Superior DTV violent martial arts action, with a career-best performance from Adkins and a keen sense both of the strengths and limits of the genre.

Holmes & Watson (2018, dir. Etan Cohen)

A celebrated detective battles a plot to assassinate Queen Victoria. A great cast, handsome production values and enthusiastic playing can’t save this mess, seemingly compiled from extensive on-set improvisations rather than a script. Inevitably, some fine moments, but this is a skit stretched to 90 minutes.