Scrooge (1935, dir. Henry Edwards)

A miser is haunted by a series of ghosts, so he may rethink his approach to Christmas and life. A charming adaptation of the oft-filmed Dickens novella A Christmas Carol, capturing a famous stage portrayal. Some lovely model effects and a keen visual sensibility; a touch of expressionism and a feel for the period on display here.

Hobbs & Shaw [AKA Fast and Furious (Presents): Hobbs & Shaw] (2019, dir. David Leitch)

Mismatched agents team up to prevent a bio-engineered villain from stealing a deadly toxin. Dumb-but-fun-but-dumb again action-comedy sidequel to the later Fast/Furious flicks. Jolly bickering and star cameos help, but the film too-quickly becomes wearying in its CG excesses when it should be at least physics-aware.

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Men In Black: International (2019, dir. F Gary Gray

A probationary agent finds herself partnered with an MIB legend when an intergalactic crisis looms. Stuttering series reboot, transplanting a star pairing from another franchise with indifferent results. Okay action, poor comedy. Misunderstanding what made the first movies successful results in a film that was more fun to make than it is to watch.

Avengement (2019, dir. Jesse V Johnson)

An escaped prisoner holds his gangster brother’s criminal friends hostage. Superior DTV violent martial arts action, with a career-best performance from Adkins and a keen sense both of the strengths and limits of the genre.

Holmes & Watson (2018, dir. Etan Cohen)

A celebrated detective battles a plot to assassinate Queen Victoria. A great cast, handsome production values and enthusiastic playing can’t save this mess, seemingly compiled from extensive on-set improvisations rather than a script. Inevitably, some fine moments, but this is a skit stretched to 90 minutes.

All The Devil’s Men (2018, dir. Matthew Hope)

A manhunt for a rogue CIA operative. Utterly rote action flick that aspires for grittiness, but is hampered by a clunky script more focused on working around a meagre budget than on being inspired into creativity by it, and by a po-faced lead performance. A guesting Bill Fichtner enlivens things early on.

Angelica (2015, dir. Mitchell Lichtenstein)

In late-Victorian London, a young mother is troubled by what might be a poltergeist. Handsome but odd cod-Freudian drama which flirts with fantasy, Jekyll & Hyde-isms, and unlocked sexuality in all kinds of ways.