Next (2007, dir. Lee Tamahori)

A Las Vegas stage magician with the ability to see into the near future is hunted by both the FBI and terrorists. High concept SF fantasy loosely based on a Philip K Dick story. The plot doesn’t really hang together, but as a series of chases, bluffs, and timey-wimey tricks, this is more than passable escapism.

Here’s the trailer.

Behind The Candelabra (2013, dir. Steven Soderbergh)

The last decade of Vegas performer Liberace’s life, from the perspective of his lover Scott Thorsen. A well-played and effective biopic, made with Soderbergh’s customary deftness, getting beyond the camp and rhinestones to explore the frailties of two people drawn to each other out of lack.

The Dying of a Last Breed (2020, dir. Brian Hennigan)

A Doug Stanhope live performance, filmed in Las Vegas in 2019. Perhaps for fans only of the misanthropic comic, Dying is nevertheless breathtaking in places for Stanhope’s determination to mine meta-comedy about touring life – and by extension, identity and the limits of free speech – and from that to work to a serious point. Dangerously close to art.

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (2013, dir. Don Scardino)

An arrogant and jaded Las Vegas stage magician has to find himself again after being sacked. Inconsistent but intermittently fantastic comedy; its perfunctory redemption arc story is bolstered with some great gags and a dark undercurrent throughout. Alan Arkin, as ever, steals the movie.

Sleepless (2017, dir. Baran bo Odar)

A rogue cop has his son kidnapped by drug dealers. A day-from-hell thriller which lifts from Die Hard and Snake Eyes (it’s a remake of Nuit Blanch) in working to sustain momentum; for the most part it holds itself together.

Jason Bourne (2016, dir. Paul Greengrass)

Jason Bourne resurfaces to deal with his past. Fifth in the franchise after the side-step of Legacy finds Bourne on top form; a story-light and linear but propulsive visually-driven action thriller, designed more as a sensory experience than narrative.

Wild Card (2014, dir. Simon West)

A burnout Las Vegas hard man gets a shot at redemption. Episodic but fun, this is superior Stathamism, based on a 1980s William Goldman novel, and a minor Burt Reynolds vehicle. Many Vegas tropes played with, some OK action, and a decent Xmas soundtrack.

The Trust (2016, dir. Alex Brewer & Benjamin Brewer)

Vegas, present day. Mismatched burnout cops Cage and Wood plan a heist on a mob-controlled safe house. Smart little black comedy thriller with a focus on character rather than action. Low-key, but worth your while, and with some decent twisty plot work.