You’re Next (2011, dir. Adam Wingard)

A family reunion is interrupted by home-invading masked killers. Superior horror flick with touches of black comedy. Knows precisely what it is and works to fulfil expectations well: a brisk, bloody job well done.

Here’s the trailer.

Jug Face [AKA The Pit] (2013, dir. Chad Crawford Kinkle)

A young woman, finding herself both pregnant and earmarked for sacrifice, tries to escape her backwoods community. Strong and unusual horror movie, anchored by a decent cast, some vivid ideas, and a sense of inevitability. Recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Mulberry Street (2006, dir. Jim Mickle)

When New York is truck by a rat-borne rage virus, the occupants of a soon-to-be-developed apartment building fight to survive. Zesty low-budget horror with a social conscience, benefitting from a Larry Cohen-ish approach to the city, and to its strong mix of genre savvy and believable characters.

Here’s the trailer.

Late Phases [AKA Night of the Wolf] (2014, dir. Adrián García Bogliano)

A blind Vietnam veteran believes his new retirement community is a werewolf hunting ground. Quirky, ambitious werewolf pic with a fondness for 80s-style practical effects. Better in moments than in its overall storytelling, but there’s some fine stuff here, and a great cast of character actors led by Nick Damici.

Here’s the trailer.

Beneath (2013, dir. Larry Fessenden)

A mismatched group of graduating high-schoolers are trapped on a boat on a lake by a ferocious fish. Fun little Jaws emulation with some mythic touches. Well-sustained given its premise, small scale and its limited resources, and played commendably straight, tho really for genre fans only. Mark Margolis pops up in welcome support.

Here’s the trailer.

The Last Winter (2006, dir. Larry Fessenden)

An Alaskan oil company-sponsored reconnaissance team succumb one by one to a mysterious force. Solid little eco-horror drawing in equal parts from base-under siege flicks like The Thing as well as from first peoples legends. A decent crew of character actors and keen location work help no end.

Here’s the trailer.

Hellbenders [AKA Hellbenders 3D] (2012, dir. JT Petty)

Unorthodox priests, who sin to make themselves attractive to demons, come up against a powerful foe. Scrappy horror-comedy that isn’t as shocking as it wants to be. Game playing from a talented cast helps, but this is a grab-bag of other, better movies.

Here’s the trailer.

Birth of the Living Dead [AKA Year of the Living Dead] (2013, dir. Rob Kuhns)

The making and impact of George A Romero’s 1968 horror film Night of the Living Dead. Genial documentary, focused on an interview with Romero himself plus genre stalwarts such as Larry Fessenden, making some straightforward though nevertheless valid points about the film’s counterculture origins and its social commentary, as well as on its genre status.

The Dead Don’t Die (2019, dir. Jim Jarmusch)

Zombies take over a small US town. Deadpan comedy-horror with a few meta touches. Not all of it works, and the approach is wry rather than outright funny, but there are some good ideas and images, and everyone involved seems to be having fun.

Pod (2015, dir. Mickey Keating)

Siblings journey to the family’s remote holiday home where their brother may be going mad. Not-bad psychological horror which takes an SF/military experiment route than the usual haunting or serial killer options. Falls apart in act 3, tho Larry Fessenden pops up.