Feats First: The Life and Music of Lowell George (2015, dir. Eliot Riddle)

A documentary exploration of the life and music of Little Feat frontman Lowell George. Overlong and reverent but still engrossing overview of the career and life of George, linking him and Little Feat to the LA of the 60s and 70s. Niche, inevitably, but well-researched and with plenty of input from the likes of Van Dyke Parks.

True Romance (1993, dir. Tony Scott)

A pop-culture geek finds true love and a suitcase of cocaine. A modern fairy story, an ode to the movies, and a movie nerd’s fantasy script come together; riffing on Malick’s Badlands and wearing its references on its sleeve, True Romance stands up well to this day, and has a cast of up-and-comers and veterans to die dor.

Colors (1988, dir. Dennis Hopper)

A veteran and a rookie struggle to work together while patrolling LA’s gang neighbourhoods. Still-influential drama that tries for nuance while establishing the look and tone of two generations of movies. Worth revisiting, not least for its direction, cinematography, and its Herbie Hancock score.

Wolves At The Door (2017, dir. John R Leonetti)

A group of friends are attacked in their LA home. Odd recreation of the Manson Family murders. Though technically competent, it barely stretches to an hour’s running time and does little except an extended stalk-and-slash sequence rendered pointless and tasteless by its real-life contexts.

Street Kings (2008, dir. David Ayer)

An alcoholic LA detective with a reputation for violence comes under scrutiny from internal affairs. Generally solid double-cross-tastic bad cop-worse cop rough-and tumble that teeters on the brink of melodrama, but just about holds it together.

This Is The End (2013, dir. Seth Rogen & Evan Goldberg)

A houseful of actors face the Apocalypse. Dumb-but-fun gross-out comedy with a bunch of moderately-famous people playing versions of themselves. Self-indulgent, but everyone is in on the joke and no-one gets harmed. Fine while it’s on.

Hotel Artemis (2018, dir. Drew Pearce)

One night in a gangsters-only private hospital in riot-torn near-future LA. Derivative but fun low-budget cyberpunk thriller, with elements of the Purge and John Wick movies. The budget’s wisely spent on strength in depth in the casting.