No Time to Die (2021, dir. Cary Joji Fukunaga)

A retired Bond combats the threat of a stolen bioweapon. Last of the Craig-era pics, this is the Avengers: Endgame of Bond flicks, rounding out a loose five-film arc. Less successful as a stand-alone movie, but it tries something different, Craig and a guesting Ana de Armas are both great, and there’s neat moments aplenty among the bombast and soapy stuff.

Here’s the trailer.

The Public (2018, dir. Emilio Estevez)

One harsh winter’s night, a sacked librarian supports a protest occupation of a city-centre library by homeless patrons. Perhaps-simplistic but heartfelt and well-meaning social issues drama with black comic touches. It’s not subtle in its execution, but you’d have to be a hard-hearted son-of-a-bitch not to enjoy the effort.

D-Tox [AKA Eye See You] (2002, dir. Jim Gillespie)

A cop in an isolated rebab facility is stalked by the serial killer who murdered his fiancee. Daft but enjoyable minor genre fare, mashing up Agatha Christie and The Thing along with a hundred other influences. A solid cast of shifty character actors keeps matters rolling along until the inevitable fighty finale.

The Laundromat (2019, dir. Steven Soderbergh)

A widow investigates an insurance company; a complicated web of financial fraud unravels. Superficially similar to The Big Short and Vice in its mix of drama, comedy and mockumentary, The Laundromat offers a clear and accessible primer to the Panama Papers scandal, and to Mossack (Oldman) and Fonseca (Banderas), both gleeful at its heart.

Hold The Dark (2018, dir. Jeremy Saulnier)

A hunt for a child snatched by wolves is more complex than it first seems. Hugely impressive wintry contemporary Western, with perhaps a touch of the supernatural. Doesn’t give up its answers easy. Highly recommended.