Skyfall (2012, dir. Sam Mendes)

Bond battles a former MI:6 agent intent on revenge on M. Superior series entry with lots to recommend it, not least a back-to-basics siege third act. A couple of wobbly moments (beware the oddly-empty tube car), but apart from those, this is superior genre entertainment.

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969, dir. Peter Hunt)

Bond again battles Blofeld; this time up to germ warfare. Despite the awkwardness at times of lead Lazenby, this is perhaps the best all-round Bond; bags of action, some self-aware humour, lovely design work and excellent direction and editing.

Dr. No (1962, dir. Terence Young)

007 investigates a diplomat’s murder; the trail leads to a nuclear conspiracy. The first Bond adaptation gets a lot of things right, not least the lead performance. Of its time, certainly, but influential in all kinds of ways, and gorgeous to look at.

Casino Royale (2006, dir. Martin Campbell)

Bond battles a private banker for terrorists. Casino Royale does a lot of things well: a series reboot, an introduction to the Daniel Craig era, and a film that connects to its source novel. It goes on too long, with perhaps one ending too many, but this one of the strongest series entries.

Die Another Day (2002, dir. Lee Tamahori)

Bond teams up with an NSA agent to uncover the truth about a conspiracy involving conflict diamonds and North Korea. Fourth, last, and least of the Brosnan Bond flicks. The central performance is good, but the script is a lazy series of puns and there’s an over-reliance on iffy CG throughout.

Spectre (2015, dir. Sam Mendes)

A political attempt to neuter M16 is found to be the work of an enemy organisation. The first two acts work well, but the last hour falls apart through trying to stitch the Craig-era Bond films into a single narrative with an awkwardly-revealed Blofeld at its centre.

You Only Live Twice (1967, dir. Lewis Gilbert)

Bond investigates stolen spacecraft so he can avert a nuclear war. Fifth in the franchise and the cracks are starting to show. Connery is jaded, and the Roald Dahl script is awkwardly dated at best. Impressive production design and a couple of neat directorial moments lift some of the tiredness.