Cruel Peter (2020, dir. Christian Bisceglia & Ascanio Malgarini)

A deaf teenager tries to summon her dead mother, but attracts other entities instead. Good-looking Italy-set horror flick that doesn’t hold back with creepy imagery taken from a hundred evil child/gothic scare/J-horror movies. Wobbles toward the climax, but some lovely touches throughout, even if the script is a collection of best bits from elsewhere.

Il Divo (2008, dir. Paolo Sorrentino)

Three years in the life of Italian politician Giulio Andreotti as his career collapses. A dazzling, swaggering, operatic approach to its unpromising-sounding subject matter pays dividends, as Sorrentino finds ways to unlock a private man. A touch impenetrable without knowledge of the actual events, but remarkable nevertheless.

Gomorrah (2008, dir. Matteo Garrone)

Five sets of lives criss-cross, linked by Camorra gang-related activity in the same Naples housing project. Based on a non-fiction expose, this is an astonishing piece of work: heartfelt, brutal, unsympathetic. The ages of man, scattered between the stories. The best of its type this side of City of God.

Zone Troopers (1985, dir. Danny Bilson)

In 1944 Italy, a US army troop behind enemy lines find a crashed spaceship. Engaging-enough low-budget SF/horror/war hybrid, with a witty script and a keen sense of its modest production values.

All The Money In The World (2017, dir. Ridley Scott)

A dramatisation of the 1973 kidnapping of John Paul Getty III. Well-acted, good-looking though insubstantial retelling of a famous case; not quite a serious drama or a straightforward thriller, and the weaker for the indecision.

Voice From The Stone (2017, dir. Eric Dennis Howell)

A nurse tries to encourage a boy to speak after the death of his mother. Good-looking but slow mystery/horror with a hundred borrowings (everything from The Others to Rebecca) and a straightforward though inevitable resolution.