Ready or Not (2019, dir. Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett)

On her wedding day, a bride finds that the games dynasty she’s marrying into has an odd – and potentially murderous – ritual. Generally solid black comedy horror with a great lead performance from Samara Weaving. Bonus points for the gratuitous Kazuo Ishiguro shoutout.

In The Tall Grass (2019, dir. Vincenzo Natali)

A pregnant woman and her brother are lured into a field of tall grass. This expansion of the Stephen King/Joe Hill novella begins well, but unravels when fresh material is introduced. Intriguing hints in the original are under-explored, and what’s new confuses rather than deepens. A disappointment, not least from this talented writer/director.

Alien Resurrection (1997, dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet)

200 years after the events of Alien 3, Ripley is cloned by military scientists eager to weaponise the xenomorph. Good-looking and humorous Part 4 with an excellent cast of character actors; tonal inconsistency and a wayward third act destabilise the storytelling. The compulsion to find new twists undoes some of the excellent earlier material presented here.

Us (2019, dir. Jordan Peele)

A family on holiday is terrorised by doppelgangers. Initially slow-burning, but ultimately incendiary horror movie with a few satirical flourishes, and brains as well as blood. Repays multiple viewings, and close attention throughout. Recommended.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s.

Event Horizon (1997, dir. Paul WS Anderson)

A search and rescue vessel investigates a fabled spaceship, thought lost. Generally effective Alien/The Shining mash-up, grounding its horror shenanigans with working guy space freighter ordinariness. Doesn’t make a lick of sense once the plot kicks in, but works just fine as a gory rollercoaster ride.

Pet Sematary (2019, dir. Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer)

A doctor and family settle in a New England community with a secret. Okay second adaptation of the Stephen King novel, itself an extended riff on WW Jacobs’ “The Monkey’s Paw”. Adds some folk horror moments and enough third act story alterations to differentiate it sufficiently from the serviceable 1989 movie version.

In the Shadow of the Moon (2019, dir. Jim Mickle)

A Philadelphia cop becomes obsessed with a recurring series of crimes, and with the person committing them. Excellent time-travel serial killer cop drama from director Jim Mickle, that touches on all manner of interesting material. Recommended.