Corporate Animals (2019, dir. Patrick Brice)

A team-building weekend goes awry when colleagues are trapped in a cave. Poor entry in the office politics horror-comedy sub-genre, with a decent cast struggling with under-powered scripting, direction, and lighting choices. There’s nice Gary Sinise and Britney Spears running gags, but that’s about it.

Here’s the trailer.

The Banana Splits Movie (2019, dir. Danishka Esterhazy)

Animatronic children’s TV characters from a long-running series come to murderous life during a show recording. A couple of plot niggles aside, this is generally a fun revisiting of the 60s show, updated a la Fantasy Island via Westworld. Could be darker in places, but matters are set up well for sequels.

Night of the Creeps (1986, dir. Fred Dekker)

A student prank gone wrong triggers the release of dormant alien parasites. Generally sprightly horror-comedy, mashing up 50s monster invasion SF, zombie flicks and sorority slashers. Joky but not spoofy, Creeps benefits from a dark touch when needed, not least with Tom Atkins’ veteran cop.

The Witches of Eastwick (1987, dir. George Miller)

Three friends accidentally conjure a priapic demon. Fun loose adaptation of the John Updike novel, offering four meaty roles for enthusiastic players. Nicholson is controlled, all are having fine time, and Miller’s direction is elegant throughout. A good job done all around.

We Summon the Darkness (2019, dir. Marc Meyers)

Six young adults party after a metal concert; a series of satanic murders is ongoing. Fun little 80s-set horror with comic notes and some subtle observations along the way. It’s kinda going where you’d expect, but doesn’t outstay its welcome and offers a decent role for star/producer Daddario.

Mayhem (2017, dir. Joe Lynch)

A rage virus infects a corporate HQ; a lowly just-sacked worker and a mortgage client fight their way to the boardroom. Gleeful horror-comedy with some straightforward points to make about capitalism and workplace culture. Splattery lo-fi fun, with good leads and solid direction helping out no end.

Satanic Panic (2019, dir. Chelsea Stardust)

A pizza delivery girl finds herself the target of rich Satanists. Cheerful horror-comedy with a class-conscious edge. Nothing much innovative on display, but this is a more than passable genre entry for fans, held together by capable direction and a pair of good lead performances.

Zombieland: Double Tap (2019, dir. Ruben Fleischer)

Ten years after the events of Zombieland; tensions split the group, but new threats emerge.  Horror-comedy z-sequel that offers pretty much the same as before, though with inevitably diminished returns. Fine for those who liked the first one, though there’s little here for anyone else.

The Dead Don’t Die (2019, dir. Jim Jarmusch)

Zombies take over a small US town. Deadpan comedy-horror with a few meta touches. Not all of it works, and the approach is wry rather than outright funny, but there are some good ideas and images, and everyone involved seems to be having fun.

Little Monsters (2019, dir. Abe Forsythe)

A loser musician and a kindergarten teacher defend a class visiting a petting zoo from zombies. Sprightly horror-comedy which balances humour, romance, gross-out violence and crassness in expert measure. Loads of fun, some heart, some songs, and a selection of great gags. Recommended.