Little Monsters (2019, dir. Abe Forsythe)

A loser musician and a kindergarten teacher defend a class visiting a petting zoo from zombies. Sprightly horror-comedy which balances humour, romance, gross-out violence and crassness in expert measure. Loads of fun, some heart, some songs, and a selection of great gags. Recommended.

Ghostbusters (1984, dir. Ivan Reitman)

A trio of disgraced academics working on the paranormal turn to the private sector. Still-effective horror-comedy balancing New York snark, slapstick, and Lovecraftian interdimensional terror. Great city cinematography, and some lovely delicate moments to counterbalance the widescreen mayhem. Both sequel and reboot followed.

The Frighteners (1996, dir. Peter Jackson)

A conman psychic who can see the dead has to confront an undead serial killer. Fast, funny and inventive supernatural comedy, with a great central performance from Fox and still-effective (and then-groundbreaking) CG effects work.

Creepshow 2 (1987, dir. Michael Gornick)

Three adaptations of Stephen King short stories: “Old Chief Woodenhead”, “The Raft” and “The Hitchhiker”. Cut-price anthology sequel that short-changes the viewer (there were five tales in Part 1), making up in rubbery gore for what the yarns lack in comedy and chills. A couple of oddly-effective moments, but that’s about it.

Office Uprising (2018, dir. Lin Oeding)

Nerdy colleagues band together after co-workers become murderous via a weaponised energy drink. Okay-while-its-on comedy-horror with a Larry Cohen-esque conceit and a whiff of The Belko Experiment. No real surprises or scares, but some nice lines and action details.

Peelers (2016, dir. Sevé Schelenz)

A strip-club owner has to defend her business and her co-workers against zombies. Awkward horror-comedy that delivers in terms of gore, but manages to mishandle what should be a gleefully tasteless B–movie; the result is too-often tacky and nastily exploitative.

George A Romero’s Land of the Dead [AKA Land of the Dead] (2005, dir. George A Romero)

A gated community is threatened by an organising army of zombies. The slickest and most mainstream of Romero’s six zombie flicks, Land has some storytelling issues but also verve in its inventiveness and its writer-director’s trademark social commentary.