Seberg (2019, dir. Benedict Andrews)

Actor Jean Seberg struggles with her personal life, civil rights activism, and the pressures of fearing FBI surveillance. Decent biopic focusing on 1968-1970; a very solid cast and subtle direction help, even if the script doesn’t get us close to the protagonist. Lots to appreciate, not least the production design and performances.

True Romance (1993, dir. Tony Scott)

A pop-culture geek finds true love and a suitcase of cocaine. A modern fairy story, an ode to the movies, and a movie nerd’s fantasy script come together; riffing on Malick’s Badlands and wearing its references on its sleeve, True Romance stands up well to this day, and has a cast of up-and-comers and veterans to die dor.

Dolemite Is My Name (2019, dir. Craig Brewer)

A biography of Rudy Ray Moore, focusing on the making of his film Dolemite. A swaggering movie with a heart, focusing – like its scriptwriters’ Ed Wood – on an upbeat try-hard outsider – with affection for the exploitation underbelly of Hollywood. As a star showcase, it reminds us how good Eddie Murphy is when he’s backed with the right material.

Henchman: The Al Leong Story (2018, dir. Vito Trabucco)

A documentary about Hollywood’s most recognizable stuntman and movie henchman. A crowdfunded production made with affection and respect for its subject. Inevitably for fans, but nevertheless fascinating, not least because the film gives a rounded picture of Leong’s work, life, and personal struggles. Recommended.

Once Upon A Time … In Hollywood (2019, dir. Quentin Tarantino)

In 1968 LA, a fading action star struggles with his future prospects. A stunning evocation of late 60s Hollywood, packed with ideas, in-jokes, good ideas, and pop-culture geekery. A shaggy dog story that meanders, but which goes into some startling – and just-about justified – places. Recommended.

This Is The End (2013, dir. Seth Rogen & Evan Goldberg)

A houseful of actors face the Apocalypse. Dumb-but-fun gross-out comedy with a bunch of moderately-famous people playing versions of themselves. Self-indulgent, but everyone is in on the joke and no-one gets harmed. Fine while it’s on.

¡Three Amigos! (1986, dir. John Landis)

Three silent movie actors are hired as gunmen to defeat a Mexican bandit. Inevitably patchy, but with moments of genius and genuine heart, this early Hollywood/Seven Samurai spoof passes the time admirably and is generous to its large cast.

Hail, Caesar! (2016, dir, Joel & Ethan Coen)

A Hollywood fixer’s day from hell. Delirious Coen Brothers’ farce, affectionately spoofing 1950s movies, while spinning another of their noirish kidnapping-goes-wrong yarns. Tons of fun, with everyone concerned clearly having a great time. Recommended.