Wrath of Man (2021, dir. Guy Ritchie)

A crime lord seeks revenge on the armed robbers who kill his son during an armoured car heist. Somewhat po-faced payback thriller, somehow cramming 85 minutes of high-octane action into 2 hours. What should be a lean killing machine gets drawn out by indulgence, Rashomonisms and Tarantinoisms. A shame, as there’s some good stuff lost in the mix.

Here’s the trailer.

The Vault [AKA Way Down] (2021, dir. Jaume Balaguero)

A young engineer is recruited to help steal a priceless artefact from an impregnable bank. Slick, good-looking and well-directed but very straightforward heist flick. A decent cast of character actors help, but there’s the sense of an opportunity missed here.

Here’s the trailer.

Echo Boomers (2020, dir. Seth Savoy)

A young man is recruited by this Chicago-based cousin for a series of art heists. Okay though too-slick-for-its-own-good thievery thriller, enlivened by a Michael Shannon supporting role and by some confidence in its execution, despite a lack of actual story.

Here’s the trailer.

El Robo del Siglo [AKA The Heist of the Century] (2020, dir. Ariel Winograd)

An Argentinian artist and his associates plan to rob a bank. Fast, funny and stylish comedy-suspense thriller, based on a true story. Lots of fun and no little swagger to it: recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Collide (2016, dir. Eran Creevy)

An American car thief in Berlin commits to a heist to fund his girlfriend’s kidney transplant. Straightforward chase thriller that takes an age to get going. There’s some good direction, and supporting villains Hopkins and Kingsley are fun, but the script is rote, foregrounding coincidences rather than ingenuity.

Here’s the trailer.

Inside Man: Most Wanted (2019, dir. MJ Bassett)

Hostage negotiators work to resolve a heist-turned-hostage situation at New York’s Federal Exchange building. Slick DTV sequel with an all-new cast of comparatively unfamiliar faces, and a few shout-outs to the original. Not bad within its limitations, though the likes of Denzel Washington are inevitably missed.

Inside Man (2006, dir. Spike Lee)

An embattled detective tries to work out how an unorthodox bank robbery became a hostage situation. Smart heist/siege movie that works as an intelligent genre piece and a sly political commentary on post-9/11 America. Lots to enjoy, with clever performances all around and plenty to think about. Recommended.

Ocean’s Eight [AKA Ocean’s 8] (2018, dir. Gary Ross)

A just-released thief puts together a jewel heist. Slick comedy-thriller with a few nods to the Clooney/Pitt/Soderbergh movies. Fun while it’s on, and everyone seems to be having a fine old time.

Widows (2018, dir. Steve McQueen)

Owing money after her husband is killed in a botched robbery, a woman assembles the wives of dead men into a new crew. Stately thriller from the ITV mini-series, balancing an examination of race, city corruption and street politics with genre thrills. Recommended.

Triple Frontier (2019, dir. JC Chandor)

Five former soldiers plan a robbery on a drug lord’s jungle hideout. Well-sustained heist-goes-wrong thriller with a military angle. A superb cast lifts straightforward genre material, somewhat elevated by serious handling and moviemaking craftsmanship throughout.