Dracula [AKA Horror of Dracula] (1958, dir. Terence Fisher)

Vampire hunters tackle an ancient evil. Innovative, brisk and for-its-time revolutionary version of the gothic horror classic, here telescoped admirably into a pacy visual thriller. Played straight, fluidly directed and still influential. Recommended. Eight sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966, dir. Terence Fisher)

English tourists find themselves at a remote Carpathian castle against locals’ advice. Brisk direct sequel to Hammer’s 1958 Dracula, without Cushing this time, but instead using bits of the Stoker (like the Renfield subplot) not co-opted first time. Some effective direction and visual imagery, plus sly humour from Philip Latham as manservant Klove.

Here’s the trailer.

The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973, dir. Alan Gibson)

In modern-day London, Dracula is behind an establishment conspiracy to unleash a plague epidemic. Modish late series entry, with loads of ideas, and an approach drawing on SF and a Bond villain plot. Fun, within its limitations, and impeccably played.