Kursk: The Last Mission [AKA The Command; AKA Kursk] (2018, dir. Thomas Vinterberg)

A sombre retelling of the 2000 Kursk submarine disaster. Okay drama-documentary that takes some liberties with the actual timeline, and which struggles to make the inevitable dramatic, despite good performances. The usual points made.

San Andreas (2015, dir. Brad Peyton)

A quake hits California; an estranged family tries to reunite. Despite hitting every dumb cliche in the disaster movie book, San Andreas is still an entertaining-enough flick, not least because it plays straight with its hackneyed material.

Alternative view here!

The Core (2003, dir. Jon Amiel)

When the earth’s core stops rotating, a mission is assembled to restart it. Enjoyably daft and self-aware big-budget B-movie, with an excellent cast of character actors playing the dopey material with an eye to stay on the right side of camp always.

Crack In The World (1965, dir. Andrew Marton)

Boffins attempting to harness the power of the earth’s molten core trigger a disaster. Unusual early disaster/SF crossover pic, hampered by now-quaint effects, variable acting, and a love triangle plot taking up much of the running time. Fun, nevertheless.

2012 (2009, dir. Roland Emmerich)

A geological event threatens global disaster. Another of Emmerich’s gently-satirical throw-em-to-the-lions iconoclastic pictures, this time playing with Mayan prophecies and CG tectonic plates shifting. Fun if you go with it.

Red Planet (2000, dir. Antony Hoffman)

The first manned mission to Mars goes awry. Straightforward SF disaster/bodycount movie with the usual nods (astronaut called Bowman etc), though more contrivances than usual. Seriously, guys, don’t take a robot with its “military” mode enabled.