Final Destination 2 (2003, dir. David R Ellis)

Strangers who narrowly miss being killed in a freeway pile-up find they are connected to those who died in the Flight 180 disaster aftermath. A sprightly sequel upping the first movie’s focus on blackly comic convoluted killing mechanisms, as Death seeks to restore order. Lots of fun, and contains maybe the greatest car crash in the movies.

6 Underground (2019, dir. Michael Bay)

A tech billionaire finances a vigilante squad dedicated to removing threats to global peace. Well-made fun-but-dumb action-comedy playing to the director’s trademark obsessions and strengths in mashing up Michael Mann and Tony Scott. An auteurist work; spectacular in both the Debordian and the blowing-shit-up-good senses.

Paradise Now (2005, dir. Hany Abu-Assad)

Two Palestinian friends are recruited for a next-day suicide mission into Tel Aviv. Intelligent drama with a few darkly comic touches; everyone has their reasons. The film works hard not to moralise, focusing on depiction and explanation, without asserting wider truth-value to its characters’ actions and beliefs.

Ready or Not (2019, dir. Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett)

On her wedding day, a bride finds that the games dynasty she’s marrying into has an odd – and potentially murderous – ritual. Generally solid black comedy horror with a great lead performance from Samara Weaving. Bonus points for the gratuitous Kazuo Ishiguro shoutout.

Assassination Nation (2018, dir. Sam Levinson)

Four high school girls are targeted by a vigilante posse after a data hack tears a town apart. Stylish and confident Trump-era satire, equal parts The Purge sequels and God Bless America. More set-up than an actual fully-fledged movie, this nevertheless has lots to recommend it if you go with it.

Mom and Dad (2017, dir. Brian Taylor)

An electronic virus drives parents to kill their children; one family home becomes a battleground. Brisk bad taste horror-comedy that gets in and out fast. Everyone is on fine form, and there’s the best use ever of a Erasure song in the movies.

Lowlife (2017, dir. Ryan Prows)

A masked failure tries to live up to the fabled reputation of his father. LA-set black comedy crime drama, involving human organ theft, kidnapping, Luchadors and gun-toting motel owners. Not for everyone, but a confident and at times affecting violent entertainment.