The Iron Giant (1999, dir. Brad Bird)

A boy befriends a massive alien robot. Smart, affecting and upbeat Cold War-era animation, varying the ET template enough to make this adaptation of Ted Hughes’ The Iron Man¬†successful in its own right. A good job done all around, with a positive message carefully dramatised.

The Angry Birds Movie 2 (2019, dir. Thurop Van Orman)

The birds and the pigs have to work together to prevent their islands from being destroyed by invaders. Okay dayglo sequel that is consistently funny even if it relies heavily on pop-culture gags and on slapstick side-missions nicked from the Ice Age movies.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018, dir. Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey & Rodney Rothman)

Miles Morales is bitten by a radioactive spider and gains superpowers, but he’s not the only Spider-Man. Visually impressive and engaging (though overlong) comic book story that emulates the reading experience as well as offering both fan service and deconstruction. Huge fun for the most part, though.

Toy Story 3 (2010, dir. Lee Unkrich)

Woody, Buzz and the others are donated to a nursery when Andy leaves home for college. The franchise goes for a fascinating prison break twist in its story focus, while both pulling on heartstrings and getting good laughs. Recommended.

Madagascar (2005, dir. Eric Darnell & Tom McGrath)

Four New York zoo animals find themselves accidentally marooned in the wilds of Madagascar. Fast and funny CG animation, with enough going on by way of slapstick, good gags, pop culture references and keen voicework to keep all ages entertained.

Coco (2017, dir. Lee Unkrich & Adrian Molina)

A boy desperate to become a musician finds himself trapped in the afterlife. Sprightly quest narrative drawing on Mexican folklore; superficial similarity to The Book of Life dampens its impact, though this is a decent Pixar effort in its own right.

Early Man (2018, dir. Nick Park)

A peaceful tribe of cave-dwellers must play football against a Bronze Age crack squad to win back their home. Lovingly-made and beautifully-detailed, this stop-motion flick from Aardman is undemanding fun, even if it’s light on jokes compared to their earlier films.