Rim Of The World (2019, dir. McG)

Four young teens at summer camp have to thwart an alien invasion. Deliberately throwback 80s kids’ SF adventure which is pleasing in the moment, though it struggles with an overly-knowing tone and with schematic and formulaic plotting and character development, while ticking off a slew of movie references.

The Darkest Dawn (2016, dir. Drew Casson)

A teenagerĀ escapes an alien invasion. More developed sequel to Hungerford, this time riffing on 28 Days Later and Heart of Darkness as much as Heinlein’s The Puppetmasters. Still some rough edges, but an improvement over the first instalment.

Hungerford (2014, dir. Drew Casson)

A group of teens witness an alien invasion. Ambitious zero-budget semi-professional found-footage zombie/alien invasion mash-up with good moments but an inability to sustain coherence through iffy script and acting. Followed by The Darkest Dawn.

Annihilation (2018, dir. Alex Garland)

An alien invasion provokes an investigation led by a biologist. Sombre SF/horror with whiffs of Arrival and Solaris in its makeup. Genre thrills are underplayed in favour of introspection and aftermath; interesting rather than good, with a perhaps divisive ending.

Independence Day (1996, dir. Roland Emmerich)

Aliens invadeĀ Earth. Patriotic, team-oriented, and generally satisfactory War of the Worlds update which shoehorns in Wells’ ending and makes space for an ensemble cast having fun plus then-state of the art effects work. Slyly tongue-in-cheek throughout.

Evolution (2001, dir. Ivan Reitman)

A pair of misfit science teachers find an Arizona meteor strike hiding an alien invasion. OK SF comedy modelled on Reitman’s earlier Ghostbusters, down to a gunge/giant monster/Dan Ackroyd finale. Julianne Moore on sprightly pratfall form.