Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 (2011, dir. David Yates)

Matters converge: a final stand at Hogwarts against Voldemort. The last part of the eight-film cycle delivers in terms of epic action sequences, resolutions for characters followed over multiple movies, and a decent coda; no real surprises, and nothing for outsiders, which is perhaps as it should be.

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004, dir. Alfonso Cuaron)

Potter is threatened by a notorious escaped prisoner and ally of the Dark Lord. The third in the sequence is a touch darker, expanding the movie universe away from the quest-based adventures of parts 1 and 2. A step up all around, with confident direction, better effects, and actors maturing into their roles.

Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991, dir. Kevin Reynolds)

Returned to England from the Crusades, a nobleman finds his lands taken and himself declared outlaw. Messy big-budget version of the oft-told tale mixing action-adventure, hammy playing and black magic/folk horror in at-times awkward measure. Fun in places though.

Galaxy Quest (1999, dir. Dean Parisot)

The former stars of a Star Trek-like TV show are mistaken for genuine space heroes by an alien race searching for saviours. Three Amigos! / A Bug’s Life redux, perhaps, but with excellent casting, a sense of fun, and affection for genre and conventions (of both kinds) throughout.

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002, dir. Chris Columbus)

Harry and friends search for a hidden part of Hogwarts. Second and perhaps the least of the Rowling adaptations, this mimics the structure of the first, though adds enough novelty to please fans, and begins to develop the series mythology.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (2001, dir. Chris Columbus)

An orphan boy finds that he’s a famous wizard child; his education begins. The first Potter movie is a straightforward breeze through the book. Awkward early performances and under-par CG aside, this is reasonable family fun, though no classic.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy (2005, dir. Garth Jennings)

Decent-enough adaptation of the Douglas Adams radio series/book/TV show which suffers – inevitably – from over-familiar┬ásource material; the new stuff works best. The cast works hard, production design is great, and there’s a sense of affection for the material and Adams throughout.