Peninsula [AKA Train To Busan Presents: Peninsula] (2020, dir. Yeon Sang-ho)

A criminal mission to recover cash from a zombie-overrun quarantine zone goes awry. Sprawling, messy, comic-book stand-alone sequel to Train to Busan. No classic this time out, though the mashup of 80s dystopian flicks like Escape from New York and later CG-ish Fast and Furious sequels is at least distinctive.

Here’s the trailer.

Unhinged (2020, dir. Derrick Borte)

A woman is targeted at random by a murderous driver after a road rage incident. Confident, unpretentious thriller with horror and action aspects. Knows exactly what it is, and is happy to work to fulfil those expectations: a professional job well done.

Here’s the trailer.

Mosul (2020, dir. Matthew Michael Carnahan)

A young police officer is co-opted into an elite SWAT team on a behind enemy lines mission in Mosul against Daesh. Compelling rookie’s eye view of a single day of combat, rendered in semi-documentary style. Plenty to appreciate, not least the refusal to overly Westernise the movie. Recommended.

Here’s the trailer.

Son Of A Gun (2014, dir. Julius Avery)

A young convict gets in over his head with a charismatic bank robber. Generally effective crime drama with a few black comic and slightly pretentious touches. Solid performances and a matter-of-fact approach to the action help.

Here’s the trailer.

Legacy of Lies (2020, dir. Adrian Bol)

A former MI6 agent’s past comes back to haunt him. OK DTV actioner from the reliable Scott Adkins, with decent fight choreography and some pizazz in the direction. Secrets and double-crosses as per, though there’s couple of interesting script wrinkles. No gamechanger, but fans will be happy.

Here’s the trailer.

Transformers (2007, dir. Michael Bay)

A teenager finds he has crucial knowledge that might prevent an intergalactic war between battling robot armies. Spectacular – in the Debordian sense – SF comedy with excellent technical credits, but shot like the fever dream of a Sunny D-addled child. Excessive, and with a nasty after-taste. Four direct sequels followed.

Here’s the trailer.

John Henry (2020, dir. Will Forbes)

A middle-aged former gang member is forced to confront his past. Slow-burn, stylised LA gangland movie that riffs on John Wick, Tarantino, westerns, folk stories and a lot more. Patchy but with impressive elements, and a fine central performance plus great Ken Foree support.

Here’s the trailer.

The Park Is Mine (1985, dir. Steven Hilliard Stern)

A struggling ex-soldier holds Central Park hostage to gain attention for veterans’ issues. Odd mix of post-First Blood action and issues-based drama, this talky oddball siege flick has a lot going for it, even if it feels compromised in its execution.

Here’s the trailer.

Ava (2020, dir. Tate Taylor)

A troubled assassin returns to her home city, but complications arise. Neither full-on action thriller or character-led drama, Ava works best simply as a star vehicle for its producer Chastain. A decent if typecast set of supporting players helps, but there’s little fresh brought to the table here.

Here’s the trailer.

Star Trek: Generations (1994, dir. David Carson)

A temporal anomaly brings Picard and Kirk together in uniting against a common temporal foe. Awkward series entry passing the movie baton to the Next Generation crew. Televisual story and handling, though, with a low-key exit for Kirk. For completists only.

Here’s the trailer.