Skyscraper (2018, dir. Rawson Marshall Thurber)

An ex-FBI agent turned security consultant must rescue his family from a high-tech skyscraper overrun by fire and criminals. Derivative though passable tosh, mashing up Die Hard and The Towering Inferno. Johnson as charismatic as ever, though he’s ill-served by a rote script.

Second and third opinions required?

The Whiskey Bandit [AKA A Viszkis] (2017, dir. Nimrod Antal)

Biopic of Hungarian/Transylvanian serial bank robber Attila Ambrus. Overlong but hugely entertaining and well-crafted story, with a great visual sensibility, that takes its time to get to the meat of its purpose. Well worth sticking with.

The Boondock Saints (1999, dir. Troy Duffy)

Two Boston Irish brothers become vigilantes. Tatty post-Pulp Fiction gangster pic, more a series of set pieces than an actual linear movie. Some OK ideas along the way, and a couple of interesting performances, but this is three parts undisciplined mess to one part film.

The Highwaymen (2019, dir. John Lee Hancock)

Two retired lawmen are recruited to hunt down and kill Bonnie and Clyde. Handsome but slow period thriller that can’t quite make up its mind if it wants to go for drama or action. Well-played, though, with a great Thomas Newman score, evoking Road To Perdition.

Triple Frontier (2019, dir. JC Chandor)

Five former soldiers plan a robbery on a drug lord’s jungle hideout. Well-sustained heist-goes-wrong thriller with a military angle. A superb cast lifts straightforward genre material, somewhat elevated by serious handling and moviemaking craftsmanship throughout.

Peppermint (2018, dir. Pierre Morel)

Five years after her family’s murder, a mother returns to the US for revenge. Straightforward action fantasy with a committed lead performance and an outsider’s view of LA. Not great, but there’s a couple of interesting plot wrinkles along the way.

Nightshooters (2018, dir. Marc Price)

A low-budget film crew is trapped in a high-rise – due for demolition – by gangsters. Impressive micro-budget action comedy with some great gags, fine stuntwork and fight choreography. Lots to enjoy for genre fans; the film’s limitations work to its advantage.