Army of One (2016, dir. Larry Charles)

A handyman believes he’s on a mission from God to kill Osama Bin Laden. Shrill semi-improvised comedy based on a true story, with Nicolas Cage turning in an unrestrained performance. Inevitably, a couple of good moments, but there’s a lot of shouting to sit through.

Ibiza Undead (2016, dir. Andy Edwards)

A lads’ vacation to Ibiza goes awry thanks to zombies. Stilted horror-comedy with variable acting, awkward plotting and a sense of a simple premise unfulfilled. A couple of good gags sneak through, and there’s an attempt at pathos towards the end, but that’s about it.

Level Up (2016, dir. Adam Randall)

A gamer is set a series of escalating race-against-time challenges to rescue his kidnapped girlfriend. Low-budget thriller with echoes of Fincher’s The Game that can’t quite work out what to do with its premise, or move fast enough to counter its implausibilities or variable acting.

Kill Me Three Times (2014, dir. Kriv Stenders)

Three sets of interrelated complications involving a jaded hit man. Great-looking and confidently-directed but thoroughly unfunny would-be comedy-thriller that tries something Tarantino/McDonagh-ish but ends up like 90s wannabes such as Three Days In The Valley.

A Walk Among The Tombstones (2014, dir. Scott Frank)

An ex-cop turned unlicensed private eye investigates a kidnapping. Generally effective adaptation of one of Lawrence Block’s Matt Scudder novels, which perhaps over-reaches by telescoping several books’ backstory into a single narrative. Bleak and autumnal; not one of Neeson’s lighter actioners.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s review.

Dr Terror’s House of Horrors (1965, dir. Freddie Francis)

Five men on a train have their fortunes told by the mysterious Dr Schreck. The first Amicus horror anthology is tremendous, mixing classic tropes with modish 60s pop culture, delivering a suite of chills and thrills backed up by expert playing from an unparalleled ensemble cast.