Tron: Legacy (2010, dir. Joseph Kosinski)

Thirty years later, Flynn’s son is scanned into the same computer universe his long-missing father found in the first film. Well-designed and with a super techno/disco soundtrack, this is a po-faced mess that can’t even sustain the daft people-as-programs conceit of its predecessor. Dull and overlong, though with OK support from a glam Michael Sheen.

Want a second opinion? Here y’go.

Tron (1982, dir. Steven Lisberger)

A hacker is scanned into his former employer’s computer network; a parallel world awaits. Odd SF/fantasy mashing up evil tech corps and voguish videogames. Simplistic and weird, with some still-stunning design and a cool mix of early CG, traditional animation, and David Warner doing his best. A sequel followed in 2010.

Other views wanted? Here y’go.

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker [AKA Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker] (2019, dir. JJ Abrams)

Forces align for a last battle between the resistance fighters and the Empire to prevent a Palpatine victory. Patchy finale to the nine-film arc which, despite stirring stuff, plus effective comic moments and detail, fails to convince in its lack of climactic story and its course-correction rewriting of the previous movie. A shame, as the new crew have earned some affection.

Color Out of Space (2019, dir. Richard Stanley)

A meteorite causes hallucinations and mutations to spread across a New England farm. Well-made adaptation of the HP Lovecraft short story. A slow burn that earns its weirdness well, accumulating details carefully, and playing properly with madness. Played commendably straight, though with many subtle genre nods for horror fans.

Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor (2013, dir. Nick Hurran)

The Tenth and Eleventh Doctors face their past, personified. Splendid movie-length episode made in 3D and cinema-released to celebrate the show’s 50th anniversary. A witty time-travel adventure typical of its then-showrunner, made with both love and a keen sense of the show’s heritage. Recommended.

Zombieland: Double Tap (2019, dir. Ruben Fleischer)

Ten years after the events of Zombieland; tensions split the group, but new threats emerge.  Horror-comedy z-sequel that offers pretty much the same as before, though with inevitably diminished returns. Fine for those who liked the first one, though there’s little here for anyone else.

VFW (2020, dir. Joe Begos)

A group of veterans defend their bar from a violent drug gang. Gory, well-cast homage to early John Carpenter flicks (and by extension Rio Bravo). A game cast have fun, everyone’s in on the joke, and it’s good to see these vets have meaty roles. Doesn’t overstay its welcome, neither.