The Nun (2018, dir. Corin Hardy)

A priest and a novice nun investigate an ancient evil linked to a convent. Daft sidequel to The Conjuring, following from a plot thread in the second movie. Good-looking in places, but po-faced and reliant on jumpscares over much in the way of narrative logic. For series completists only.

And here’s a second opinion from the 255Review crew.

 

 

Leprechaun Returns (2018, dir. Steven Kostanski)

The building of a remote sorority house disturbs an ancient evil. OK sequel that ties directly back to the first in the long-running series. Plenty of kills, some splattery gore, and a couple of reasonable gags, even if there’s little here for series newbies.

Wolves At The Door (2017, dir. John R Leonetti)

A group of friends are attacked in their LA home. Odd recreation of the Manson Family murders. Though technically competent, it barely stretches to an hour’s running time and does little except an extended stalk-and-slash sequence rendered pointless and tasteless by its real-life contexts.

The Ruins (2008, dir. Carter Smith)

Vacationing students journey to a ruined Mayan temple to find missing friends. Modest but effective horror flick, handled with some care and attention. Makes the most of what’s essentially a single setting, and doesn’t try to over-explain, or overstay its welcome

Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991, dir. Kevin Reynolds)

Returned to England from the Crusades, a nobleman finds his lands taken and himself declared outlaw. Messy big-budget version of the oft-told tale mixing action-adventure, hammy playing and black magic/folk horror in at-times awkward measure. Fun in places though.

The Perfection (2019, dir. Richard Shepard)

A former child prodigy cellist returns to her music school after a decade away. An excellent horror movie that plays with audience expectations in interesting ways, going into some deep dark places. To say more would be to ruin it. It feels most like Get Out, though is very different.

Young Frankenstein (1974, dir. Mel Brooks)

A distant relative inherits both Frankenstein’s castle and interest in reviving the dead. Splendid homage/spoof of the 1930s Universal movies, this is a broad comedy made with respect for the originals while still ticking off every gag in the undead book. Recommended.