Midsommar (2019, dir. Ari Aster)

A bereaved student in a failing relationship becomes part of a group visit to a Scandinavian commune. Contrived but watchable Kubrick-does-The-Wicker-Man folk horror. Does exactly what you’d expect, at some length, but has mesmerising sequences even if you might not quite buy what’s going on.

Another view? Here you go.

Time Trap (2017, dir. Ben Foster & Mark Dennis)

Searching for their college professor, a group of students find themselves lost in a cave system where spacetime is distorted. Solid-enough low-budget SF/horror that grounds itself with location shooting. Some variable scripting and acting, perhaps inevitably, but the film doesn’t overwork its premise.

Ghostbusters (1984, dir. Ivan Reitman)

A trio of disgraced academics working on the paranormal turn to the private sector. Still-effective horror-comedy balancing New York snark, slapstick, and Lovecraftian interdimensional terror. Great city cinematography, and some lovely delicate moments to counterbalance the widescreen mayhem. Both sequel and reboot followed.

10 to Midnight (1983, dir. J Lee Thompson)

A veteran cop is determined to bring a multiple-murder suspect to justice. Lumpen sub-Dirty Harry horror-thriller, blending police procedural with slasher pic. Despite an interesting approach to its villain, this is straightforward exploitation fare, its director’s and star’s former glories notwithstanding.

Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985, dir. George Miller & George Ogilvy)

Max Rockatansky encounters a fledgeling civilisation in the desert. The third (though chronologically fourth, after Fury Road) Mad Max flick is glossier, talkier and generally lighter than its predecessors, but nevertheless works as a hugely detailed action fantasy riffing on Peter Pan and Riddley Walker while delivering a fantastic chase sequence.

The Frighteners (1996, dir. Peter Jackson)

A conman psychic who can see the dead has to confront an undead serial killer. Fast, funny and inventive supernatural comedy, with a great central performance from Fox and still-effective (and then-groundbreaking) CG effects work.

Fractured (2019, dir. Brad Anderson)

A woman and daughter go missing in an ER. Crisp, clean paranoid conspiracy thriller engaging with the director’s recurring themes of guilt and paranoia. The kind of professional, lean, efficient movie they don’t make too many of any more. Recommended.