Cut (2000, dir. Kimble Rendall)

Murders recommence when film students attempt to complete a supposedly cursed unfinished horror movie. Passable low-budget Aussie mashup of Scream and Wes Craven’s New Nightmare, with a few quirky kills and a fun Molly Ringwald performance.

All The Boys Love Mandy Lane (2006/2013, dir. Jonathan Levine)

A distant teenage girl becomes the object of unwanted attention. Smart, well-directed horror flick that explores the boundaries of the high-school slasher movie. Good performances, a touch of bleakness, and unsettling moments of gore make for a well-judged genre experience.

Schlock [AKA Banana Monster] (1973, dir. John Landis)

A revived prehistoric apeman terrorises California. Episodic and absurdist, while directly spoofing 2001, King Kong, Frankenstein and a host of other movies, Schlock has some ramshackle charm and a few strong sequences, plus a well-realised creature at its heart, and a clear love of monster flicks powering it.

Dead & Buried (1981, dir. Gary Sherman)

The town sheriff investigates a series of murders in a New England fishing community. Odd horror piece with excellent technical credits and some creepy ideas, plus one standout performance. Works better on a tonal rather than a logical level: less weird than Phantasm, though scarcely mainstream.

We Summon the Darkness (2019, dir. Marc Meyers)

Six young adults party after a metal concert; a series of satanic murders is ongoing. Fun little 80s-set horror with comic notes and some subtle observations along the way. It’s kinda going where you’d expect, but doesn’t outstay its welcome and offers a decent role for star/producer Daddario.

The Wretched (2019, dir. The Pierce Brothers)

A troubled teen comes to believe that his neighbour is a witch. Okay horror flick that plays with a few well-established sets of tropes and images but which manages to do so in a way that feels fresh enough. An interesting marina location helps, as does an unfamiliar cast and some very solid practical effects work.

Sunshine (2007, dir. Danny Boyle)

A last-ditch effort to restart the Sun through deploying a nuclear device goes awry. Handsome though derivative SF that can’t decide if it’s an arthouse piece or a mainstream thriller. In trying to be both, and in quoting from Alien, 2001, 2010, Silent Running, Event Horizon, Dark Star and others along the way, it struggles for clarity and distinctiveness.

The Burning (1981, dir. Tony Maylam)

Five years after being burned alive, a caretaker returns to the woods near his old summer camp job. Derivative but somehow superior slasher, benefitting from excellent practical effects and some arty directorial moments. Nods to Psycho, Deliverance and Don’t Look Now, plus some subtlety between the horny teens and the kills.

Mayhem (2017, dir. Joe Lynch)

A rage virus infects a corporate HQ; a lowly just-sacked worker and a mortgage client fight their way to the boardroom. Gleeful horror-comedy with some straightforward points to make about capitalism and workplace culture. Splattery lo-fi fun, with good leads and solid direction helping out no end.

Satanic Panic (2019, dir. Chelsea Stardust)

A pizza delivery girl finds herself the target of rich Satanists. Cheerful horror-comedy with a class-conscious edge. Nothing much innovative on display, but this is a more than passable genre entry for fans, held together by capable direction and a pair of good lead performances.