Bear Island (1979, dir. Don Sharp)

An Arctic scientific expedition is used as cover for different factions searching for old U-boat pens and Nazi gold. Great location work and impressive sets, plus a strong cast, enliven this otherwise-talky thriller adapted from an Alastair MacLean novel.

Judge Dredd (1995, dir. Danny Cannon)

Dredd is framed in a revenge conspiracy and loses his Judge status. Patchy first attempt at the iconic 2000AD character, with twice as many daft ideas as good ones. Some striking moments, though, and some still-impressive design and effects work.

2012 (2009, dir. Roland Emmerich)

A geological event threatens global disaster. Another of Emmerich’s gently-satirical throw-em-to-the-lions iconoclastic pictures, this time playing with Mayan prophecies and CG tectonic plates shifting. Fun if you go with it.

Frost/Nixon (2008, dir. Ron Howard)

Peter Morgan’s adaptation of his own play about the 1977 David Frost/Richard Nixon TV interviews. A riveting docudrama which plays like a thriller, anchored by two standout performances in the title roles, supported ably by a strong cast. Recommended.

The Accountant (2016, dir. Gavin O’Connor)

A forensic accountant with social skills issues is also an assassin, specialising in killing international criminals. Oddball action drama with a weird premise and a lead character with the kind of autism found only in movies. Not terrible, but feels like three different spec scripts combined into one.

Hot Fuzz (2007, dir. Edgar Wright)

An over-performing cop is sent to a rural backwater; and then the killings start. Affectionate spoof of US buddy action movies with a touch of Midsomer Murders. Slightly overstays its welcome with a never-ending third act, but very solid and entertaining nevertheless.

Spectre (2015, dir. Sam Mendes)

A political attempt to neuter M16 is found to be the work of an enemy organisation. The first two acts work well, but the last hourĀ falls apart through trying to stitch the Craig-era Bond films into a single narrative with an awkwardly-revealed Blofeld at its centre.