Mission: Impossible: Rogue Nation (2015, dir. Christopher McQuarrie)

Ethan Hunt and the disavowed MI team track down a terrorist organisation named The Syndicate. Slick, expansive and fast. The series high-point to date, with a breakout performance from newcomer Rebecca Ferguson.

Want another review? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s thoughts.

Entebbe [AKA 7 Days in Entebbe] (2018, dir. Jose Padilha)

Dramatization of an infamous 1976 plane hijacking, and the subsequent rescue mission. Even-handed but glum retelling which doesn’t know how to approach its subject, meaning the end result is neither political allegory, action drama or straight history. Disappointing.

Bird Box (2018, dir. Suzanne Bier)

After an apocalyptic event, a woman battles to get her two children to safety. Initially interesting though ultimately very straightforward survival yarn with some good supporting performances.

And here’s Xussia’s review.

 

Death Wish (2018, dir. Eli Roth)

After his wife is murdered in a home invasion, a mild-mannered doctor turns vigilante. Tonally-inconsistent remake of the 70s Bronson flick. Horror and black comedy elements along with the violent action, and flirtation with Willis/Kersey as psychotic. Not uninteresting in its way.

Want another opinion? Here’s Xussia’s take.

 

Mission: Impossible: Ghost Protocol (2011, dir. Brad Bird)

Ethan Hunt and his IMF team hunt down an extremist with a nuclear capability. More of a series of (admittedly fun and exciting) set-pieces than a movie as such, this fourth instalment is exhilarating while its on, but doesn’t leave a lasting impression.

Want another perspective? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s POV.

Ghost Stories (2017, dir. Andy Nyman & Jeremy Dyson)

A paranormal investigator is given three cases to solve which will apparently prove the existence of the afterlife. Hugely entertaining and clever reworking of old-as-the-hills material, perhaps better enjoyed on a second viewing so its construction can be appreciated.

For another perspective, here’s Xussia’s view.

Rampage (2018, dir. Brad Peyton)

A zoologist and a renegade scientist team up to stop genetically-enhanced animals rampaging. Perfunctory and slightly po-faced monster mayhem, with only Jeffrey Dean Morgan’s man in black entering properly into the tongue-in-cheek fray.