Mary Poppins (1964, dir. Robert Stevenson)

In Edwardian London, a magical nanny aids a family in need. Solid musical comedy with then state-of-the-art animation/live-action hybrid sequences and practical effects. Some great songs, a sense of playfulness, and an iconic central performance. A sequel was made in 2018.

Ma (2019, dir. Tate Taylor)

A middle-aged woman seeks revenge on those who tormented her as a teen by targeting their now-teenage children. Interesting slow-burn take on the psycho-thriller, with a decent sense of ordinariness to it and some clever casting and playing throughout. Perhaps doesn’t push its core idea to the limit, but well-executed nevertheless.

Arthur Christmas (2011, dir. Sarah Smith)

Santa’s awkward younger son has to deliver an overlooked gift so that Christmas can be saved. Excellent, quirky and gently-subversive animation with heart and brains, delivering slapstick, pathos and some flashes of dark humour. Lots to enjoy, including shout-outs to other Aardman characters.

Matrix Revolutions [AKA The Matrix: Revolutions] (2003, dir. The Wachowskis)

Neo’s battle against Smith and The Machines comes to a head. Third and final part of the Matrix trilogy (a part four is on its way). For series completists only by this stage, though the finale delivers in terms of slightly-humourless comic-book spectacle and epic battles aplenty.

Inside Man: Most Wanted (2019, dir. MJ Bassett)

Hostage negotiators work to resolve a heist-turned-hostage situation at New York’s Federal Exchange building. Slick DTV sequel with an all-new cast of comparatively unfamiliar faces, and a few shout-outs to the original. Not bad within its limitations, though the likes of Denzel Washington are inevitably missed.

Bad Samaritan (2018, dir. Dean Devlin)

A petty thief disrupts the life of a sadist and possible serial killer. Well-sustained medium-budget thriller with horror notes that plays fair, and which engages with contemporary technology in interesting ways. Of its modest type, quite elegant.

Dragged Across Concrete (2018, dir. S. Craig Zahler)

Two suspended detectives needing money plan to hijack the proceeds of a crime. Slow-burn minimalist neo-noir procedural thriller that takes time with its characters, allowing you to understand – if not agree with – their actions. Long, but enthralling, and brutal at times. Recommended.