Matrix Revolutions [AKA The Matrix: Revolutions] (2003, dir. The Wachowskis)

Neo’s battle against Smith and The Machines comes to a head. Third and final part of the Matrix trilogy (a part four is on its way). For series completists only by this stage, though the finale delivers in terms of slightly-humourless comic-book spectacle and epic battles aplenty.

Inside Man: Most Wanted (2019, dir. MJ Bassett)

Hostage negotiators work to resolve a heist-turned-hostage situation at New York’s Federal Exchange building. Slick DTV sequel with an all-new cast of comparatively unfamiliar faces, and a few shout-outs to the original. Not bad within its limitations, though the likes of Denzel Washington are inevitably missed.

Bad Samaritan (2018, dir. Dean Devlin)

A petty thief disrupts the life of a sadist and possible serial killer. Well-sustained medium-budget thriller with horror notes that plays fair, and which engages with contemporary technology in interesting ways. Of its modest type, quite elegant.

Dragged Across Concrete (2018, dir. S. Craig Zahler)

Two suspended detectives needing money plan to hijack the proceeds of a crime. Slow-burn minimalist neo-noir procedural thriller that takes time with its characters, allowing you to understand – if not agree with – their actions. Long, but enthralling, and brutal at times. Recommended.

Booksmart (2019, dir. Olivia Wilde)

Awkward best friends decide to let go of their insecurities the night before their high school graduation. Splendid and funny reworking of well-trampled material; a coming-of-age / rite-of-passage / night-from-hell story done right, and both played and directed with a keen sense of the subgenres. Recommended.

Accident Man (2018, dir. Jesse V Johnson)

A hitman who specialises in making his kills look like accidents is targeted for termination. Uneven but at times tremendous DTV martial arts black comedy. Plenty of action throughout, and a decent cast of genre staples making the most of their opportunities.

6 Underground (2019, dir. Michael Bay)

A tech billionaire finances a vigilante squad dedicated to removing threats to global peace. Well-made fun-but-dumb action-comedy playing to the director’s trademark obsessions and strengths in mashing up Michael Mann and Tony Scott. An auteurist work; spectacular in both the Debordian and the blowing-shit-up-good senses.

Enchanted (2007, dir. Kevin Lima)

A fairytale princess is magically transported to present-day New York. Excellent musical rom-com which satirises and celebrates Disney animated fairy stories at the same time. Lots to enjoy: great songs, fine performances, a keen sense of self-awareness, and no little affection for its subjects.

Scrooge (1935, dir. Henry Edwards)

A miser is haunted by a series of ghosts, so he may rethink his approach to Christmas and life. A charming adaptation of the oft-filmed Dickens novella A Christmas Carol, capturing a famous stage portrayal. Some lovely model effects and a keen visual sensibility; a touch of expressionism and a feel for the period on display here.

Paradise Now (2005, dir. Hany Abu-Assad)

Two Palestinian friends are recruited for a next-day suicide mission into Tel Aviv. Intelligent drama with a few darkly comic touches; everyone has their reasons. The film works hard not to moralise, focusing on depiction and explanation, without asserting wider truth-value to its characters’ actions and beliefs.