A Walk Among The Tombstones (2014, dir. Scott Frank)

An ex-cop turned unlicensed private eye investigates a kidnapping. Generally effective adaptation of one of Lawrence Block’s Matt Scudder novels, which perhaps over-reaches by telescoping several books’ backstory into a single narrative. Bleak and autumnal; not one of Neeson’s lighter actioners.

Want another perspective? Here’s Xussia’s review.

Dr Terror’s House of Horrors (1965, dir. Freddie Francis)

Five men on a train have their fortunes told by the mysterious Dr Schreck. The first Amicus horror anthology is tremendous, mixing classic tropes with modish 60s pop culture, delivering a suite of chills and thrills backed up by expert playing from an unparalleled ensemble cast.

Scorpio (1973, dir. Michael Winner)

A veteran CIA agent wants out; he goes on the run, his protege is contracted to kill him. Glum international thriller that wants to be Le Carre. Some good moments and much quality in the cast, but this is standard downbeat spy stuff.

Dunkirk (2017, dir. Christopher Nolan)

Three linked stories, told in different timescales, related to the Allied retreat from Dunkirk. Equal parts puzzle, technical marvel, victory-from-defeat drama, disaster movie and arthouse flick, Nolan’s film is a thing of bleak and understated beauty. Highly recommended.

Want another 255 view? Here’s Xussia’s perspective.

Body of Lies (2008, dir. Ridley Scott)

A CIA operative in the Middle East is caught between conflicting loyalties. Good-looking and well-directed though predictable tale of post-9/11 espionage, with opaque masculine moralities contrasted with a female archetype representing possible redemption.

Life (2017, dir. Daniel Espinosa)

An ISS research team discover a life-form in a sample of Mars soil. Effective and well-sustained creature feature, making the most of its actors and the limitations of the space station environment to create plausible tension. Recommended for genre fans.

Want a second opinion? Here’s Lemonsquirtle’s take.